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Just Peachy Keen


Growing up, Suzanna was embarrassed by her mother's use of down-home expressions in front of her friends, things like "peachy keen", "fixin' to", "hissy fit", and "drier than a popcorn fart"; it was okay if they were home alone, but she thought her mother was way too much of a country hick to impress her popular friends.

"Please, Mom" she would beg, "don't say anything dumb when my friends are around, their mom's don't talk like that." 

Suzanna's mother would just smile and respond, "Suzanna, I was raised a country girl, and that's just who I am; friends you have to change your ways for aren't much worth having."

Years later Suzanna found herself missing her mom who had recently died, and even those silly old-fashioned expressions that were so much a part of her; stopping at a roadside stand to buy some fresh peaches one summer afternoon, Suzanna felt sad about all the times she'd criticized her.

Suddenly a peach tumbled from atop a basket and landed at her feet; bending over to pick it up she could almost feel her mother smiling.

 "That was peachy keen, Mom" she said, laughing through her tears.

 ~*~*~*~*~*~*~
 I'm joining Zoe at "Uncharted"
where the cue this week is "peach"
 
Come and read some great stories and share one of your own!

28 comments:

  1. Such a beeeeaauuuuutiful story, Josie. The last line is so touching . So very well written .
    Love,
    Moon

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    1. Thank you so much, dearest Moon! I think that most of us see things about our parents in a different light once we have grown up.

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  2. We have regretted in this fashion, thanks for a wake UP. We should be less judgmental.

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    1. As a young person we tend to see things only from our perspective and we fail to view our parents are real people outside of their appointed role. It is only when they have grown old or passed on that we realize they were a treasure all along.

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  3. What embarrasses us as youngsters usually turns out to be what does not matter. Well told!

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    1. That is so true, Mimi. I think many parents today would do well to "embarrass" their children a bit more in front of their friends when it comes to discipline and preaching common sense! So often it is the children who appear to be in charge now.

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  4. Pennies...or PEACHES...from heaven! Thanks for the smile. Mom was right.

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    1. I'm glad you liked this Deborah Lee! Yes, Mom was most certainly right about this. Precious indeed are the friends who encourage us to become the best we can be, instead of the worst.

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  5. very nicely done, funny and touching (something for everyone!)
    And like Paul says, we've all been in a position to experience the first condition (of the young thinking their perspective should be inviolate) and, for a few, to come to the realization of the true value of those times.

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    1. You are so right, Clark. Young people tend to find fault with just about everything about their parents, and while no parent is perfect, when we grow old we look back and realize they were right about so many things, and most did the very best they could with what they knew.

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  6. Very touching! I remember being embarrassed by how my mother drove, compared to the other mothers. She would have both hands on the wheel and never sped, never spun a tire. Such a silly thing now. Thankfully, I never voiced this.
    Visit me @ Life & Faith in Caneyhead. 😉

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    1. It is funny the things that we found embarrassing at that age, Barbara, so horrifying at the moment! I was blessed in that my friends all thought my mom was awesome, they stopped by to visit her long after we were grown up and on our own. I think of how some children experienced childhood with parents who were alcoholics or abusive, and they had good reason to want to hide their reality, we had it so easy by comparison.

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  7. Drier than a popcorn fart??? What does that even mean??? Lolol! Peachy keen story!!!

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    1. Papa Bear and I grew up in different parts of the country yet we both heard that expression from our parents/grandparents. One can be assured when that is said that the ground is too dry and the crops are suffering. As kids we found that expression pretty funny, since fart was otherwise a taboo word in our household! Glad you liked the story. :-)

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  8. Aww brought tears to my eyes. Great story!

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    1. Awesome, it was intended to be a sentimental piece, a reminder that we miss our parents when they're gone, imperfect as they were and as we most certainly are.

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  9. You are right we were embarrassed when parents (in my case grandparents were the ones) talked in local dialect or outdated ways but how we would love to hear them now.

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    1. Isn't that the truth, Old Egg! I would give anything to hear those expressions and often the laughter that followed! One of my mother's favorites if we were acting up was to say "Tie your little bull outside." That always made us laugh, but the point was made.

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  10. I've never heard the expression, "drier than a popcorn fart." As a young girl, I too probably would have been embarrassed if my Mom had said that in front of my friends.
    I think it is good that there are some things we regret thinking or doing, because all of us make mistakes and/or judge a person, often a family member when we don't know all the circumstances. Once we come to understand more fully, we see more clearly, and growth within us has taken place. We are here on this earth to learn and to grow and reach our potential as much as we can.
    Lovely story.

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    1. That's a familiar expression to both Papa Bear and I, although my mother wouldn't likely have said it in front of my friends. Moms were pretty careful about language back then, which is certainly better than what kids hear their parents saying all the time now!! I like your perspective on regret, it results in growth if we examine our behavior and realize we were looking at things wrong. Regret, like failure, is good if we use it as a tool for change!

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  11. Good one again, Josie..."friends you have to change your ways for aren't much worth having" is so true!

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    1. Thank you, Janet. Young people, and even adults often try so hard to be what their "friends" want them to be, or to be like them, when more often than not they would be better off finding friends that reflect their own values and live the way they were taught.

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  12. Am I the only one who has heard "drier than a popcorn fart"?! (One of my husband's lines, perhaps borrowed from his mother)
    Nicely done, there's a lot in these six sentences.

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    1. Papa Bear grew up in East Texas, and I grew up in the Midwest, but we both heard this expression at home. I think maybe it's a carryover from rural life and always worrying about the weather and the condition of crops. As kids we found "popcorn fart" such a funny expression. Then again, I know a few people who expel a lot of hot air in more than one manner! :-)

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  13. Never heard "drier than a popcorn fart" in my life, but the expressions add color and texture to your story. It's the little things of a character that make them so vivid in stories. Suzanne learned to appreciate her mom for who she was and missed her terribly. A very nice ending reminding us our departed loved ones are close by and come to us in everyday reminders. Peachy keen story, Josie.

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    1. Apparently you have to be raised in a rural environment to be familiar with that one, Val! :-) As the years pass we do develop a greater appreciation for the people our parents were, in addition to them filling a role in our lives. There is so much more I wish I knew about my parents now. I believe like you do, that our loved ones are always with us, not far away, and find little ways to show us. I'm glad you liked my story!

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  14. Superb story and very well written.

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    1. Thank you so much for the kind compliments, Neel!

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