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Secrets of the Old Farmhouse - Part XV

 
 
As Jill sat down it only took a moment for the intensity of this moment to sink in.  At last she had come face to face with spirit of Catherine's father, Hezekiah, the family patriarch, her great-grandfather, the man who had built the farmhouse she now called home.  She thought about how hard life had been for his family and about the losses he suffered, and as she witnessed him now sitting there sobbing and broken, tears flooded her own eyes and she longed to set him free. 
 
"Grandfather," she began, "Seth and I love this beautiful old house; we want to take care of it for you, and we want it to be a place where love grows again.  You are welcome to stay here with us as long as you like, but I don't want you to be sad anymore; what's done is done and it can't be undone, but Naomi and Catherine have long since forgiven you, and they have moved on to the light.  You can go and join them whenever you are ready; they are waiting for you on the other side,  and Jacob is too."
 
(To be continued) 
 ~Image Source~
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 I'm joining Zoe at "Uncharted"
where the cue this week is "sink"
Come and read some great stories and poems and share one of your own!

20 comments:

  1. Sad is bad. He needs to get happy!

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    1. Remorse is good, but then there has to be a moving on from it.

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    1. All she wants is for the house to be a happy, peaceful place, so she will do whatever it takes to achieve that.

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  3. On the other hand if Jill and Seth calm him and see that things are OK he may want to stay with them! I'll be interested to see where you take this!

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    1. I think you will be surprised at what his future at the old farmhouse holds. :-)

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  4. I wonder what he will decide to do. He's got week to think about it!


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    1. This made me laugh, Keith, in a way you are right! Or at least a week... or more... before we find out where his future is.

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  5. I imagine (the) comments of us Readers will be an interesting insight into human nature as if the story itself.
    I find myself feeling much less charitable towards Hezekiah than most of your more mature and good-spirited people... lol (it will be best that I limit my comments at this point)
    as they say, blog comments are the rearview mirrors of the soul lol

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    1. You are right Clark, I always enjoy seeing what each of you will say by way of response. :-) In the earlier part of this story I felt like you did about Hezekiah. He reminded me too much of someone I knew. Always standing on the Word and yet not having an ounce of mercy or compassion in him. People like that have missed the message, I think. But in the end, I'd much rather see someone feel remorse than arrogance and anger. I think Hezekiah (note that I didn't even dignify him with a name until this post)realizes that his choices and behavior were wrong, and hurt the people he loved most. Jill is an incredibly compassionate person, she believes in the gospel of forgiveness, and if she can forgive him on behalf of the family, then I suppose I can forgive him too. He just may yet redeem himself... stay tuned!

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  6. Clark's comments always appeal to me in a review mirror type of way. lol. This story is so sweet and I'm hoping Hezakiah (good name) can be released from his guilty angst. Whatever he decides will bring peace to his soul and probably to Jill and Seth. Love this continuing saga.

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    1. Clark is great for providing the much needed alternative perspective! :-) I chose his name because Hezekiah in the Bible was such a good man, and Catherine's father could have been, but chose to twist the meaning of being good and turn it into something hurtful. I wanted him to be sorry for how his choices were responsible for so much pain in the old farmhouse. Repentance is necessary, but perhaps there is hope for him yet. Jill believes that there is always hope, and so do I.

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  7. Sometimes people are the hardest on themselves and find it hard to believe that they can be forgiven, perhaps because they themselves haven't experienced the joy that can come when they are willing to forgive someone. I look forward to seeing how Hezekiah handles this situation.

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    1. That's very insightful, Pat, and I agree with you. I know far too many people who are unable to forgive, especially themselves. Doing so is such a sweet feeling of burdens lifted!

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  8. I still have a chunk of this in the middle to catch up on, but yet I'm still able to follow this tale. I kind of love the feeling of the old house. Like all old places and really all homes, I suppose, it has many things to say...

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    1. I love the old farmhouse too, Lisa. I knew one very much like it and it is always in my mind as I write the story. Because there are sections to the tale, it's fairly easy to pick up a piece of it without losing too much. I am always fascinated by the stories that old houses could tell about the lives and living that took place there. I wish I was able to tap into that at times.

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  9. Ah, my heart clenched at that image of him sitting there drenched in such sadness and remorse. I hope he finds the light! I am so far behind, I gotta go read the new ones stat!

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    1. It broke my heart too, and definitely Jill's as well. If we can feel hardness in the presence of so much pain, there is something wrong with us I think.

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Your comments are always appreciated... they make me smile! :-)