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Secrets of the Old Farmhouse - Part V

 
"One thing led to another," Uncle Jake continued, "and it wasn't long before Catherine found herself in a family way.  She was afraid to tell her father because she knew he would be furious, so her mother had to do it; she pleaded with him to allow the two young people to marry." 
 
"No child of mine is going to marry outside the church," her father had roared in anger, "I told her to stay away from that boy.  Send her away to your family, I don't want to talk to her or even see her, she is a disgrace."
 
So Catherine had no choice but to leave home... heartbroken, distraught, and afraid.  Her father had no idea how deeply he would come to regret his words.
 
(To be continued) 
 ~Image Source~
 ~*~*~*~*~*~*~
 I'm joining Ivy Walker at "Uncharted"
where the cue this week is "home"
Come and share your story with us!

20 comments:

  1. It's sad when such anger is allowed to rule a situation. Nice continuation!

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    1. You are right Mimi, those kinds of situations can cause hurts and regrets that last a lifetime.

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  2. Thanks for commenting on my blog, I came to like your blog, I see the story is continued not sure how to follow you so I can finish reading an interesting story.

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    1. I will be back each Thursday with a new installment. There is also a tab called "Serial Stories" at the top of this page where you can find the latest updates to the ongoing tale. :-)

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  3. storms of emotion, surely leaves no one un-touched.

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    1. Very true, Clark. The actions of one inevitably affects the entire family, and I am glad the days o "absolute authority" are no more, such heartache it often caused when tempers flared.

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  4. How times have changed. I'm sure this situation was a common family horror back in the days of the Old Farmhouse. Regret hangs in the air at the end of Part V. I like thinking about the mom's perspective, Catherine's and we know the father's. But the father's word was law back then. The photo of the house hides the turmoil inside. It looks so unassuming and pastoral. But the walls are talking. And I'm listening.

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    1. Thank you for such a thoughtful comment, Val! You are right, the way things appear from the outside is often very different from what was actually transpiring within. That was true back then and it still is now.

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  5. Definitely need to catch up here - did I really lose an entire month being sick???
    Such a true reflection of that time, and perhaps unfortunately so.

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    1. You are right, this wasn't at all uncommon, both in the activity and the decisions made. Sadly, compassion wasn't the rule of the day back then, and maybe not even so much in my parent's generation. I am glad we are more in tune to being nurturing and supportive parents now. It works out so much better for all concerned!

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    2. I am afraid that this is just the beginning of the heartaches this family endured. I hope we will also discover some blessings and joys along the way. Life was often hard back then, but love was also strong.

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  6. My how times have changed.I assume from your words that a reconciliation is not on the cards for a future episode!

    Click to visit Keith's Ramblings!

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    1. And it is a good thing that they have changed, Keith. Sometimes in the effort to keep the children on the straight and narrow, more damage was done than good. Psychology wasn't in the picture back then, just "spare the rod and spoil the child". Sadly, as we found out in an earlier piece of this story, Catherine's life ends before her return home. I wonder how her father will deal with that.

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  7. These kinds of differences make me so sad....i guess cuz it seems so unecessary to be so intolerant

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    1. It seems that way to me too, Zoe. I'm afraid I would not have fared well in those times, absolute deference to authority doesn't sit well with me, because too often that authority is heartless.

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  8. That kind of situation was so very hush hush back then. Girls were often sent out of state to live with a relative, or to end the pregnancy. If they were attending school, that was frequently also the end of their schooling. The father had the upper hand and the last say. I've often wondered how the generation before handled such things.

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    1. The appearance of being a morally upright family was so important back then, Pat, and even in my generation, even though it was commonly acknowledged that good children sometimes make mistakes. I think that parents thought to go soft on sin was to ensure their child's downfall. Sadly, compassion didn't seem to coexist with that, justice and mercy is a two-winged bird.

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  9. So sad how public perception and anger ruled over Love in those times. Such unforgiving times. I know some think our times too lenient, but I think it's never wrong to act in love towards someone. That doesn't mean you agree with the situation -- but anger and hatred and judgement never made a bad situation better.

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    1. I totally agree, Rory. Compassion always wins the day. Once a child is created there is no returning it, so the best course is to accept what is, forgive with love, and move forward together. Not all parents back then were as harsh as this father, but as we see, he ends up regretting that stance. Nothing was gained by it, and so much was lost. Sometimes I think we forget that God is merciful, and we can be too.

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Your comments are always appreciated... they make me smile! :-)