Secrets of the Old Farmhouse - Part IV

 
Now that Jill knew the story of little Joseph and his tragic death, she was curious to know more about his mother Catherine, who was just sixteen when she died giving birth to him; she couldn't help but think about how difficult it had been for Catherine to be sent away in shame, and how sad and lonely she must have been while awaiting the birth of the child she knew her parents would not allow her to keep.
 
Once again Jill turned to her Uncle Jake to find out what more he knew about his Aunt Catherine. 
From him she learned that Catherine had been the youngest of five children,  and being the only daughter she was the apple of her father's eye.  When he learned that the neighbor boy was paying attention to his daughter he was furious, even though his family and the neighbors had gotten along fine until then. 
 
"Back in those days people didn't marry outside the church they belonged too," Uncle Jake explained to Jill, "it was considered to be a sure ticket to damnation,  so when my grandfather forbid her to have anything more to do with him, Catherine and the boy crafted plans to meet up with each other at times and places where they wouldn't be found out.  She would go out berry-picking or take a book to read underneath a shady tree by the creek on a warm afternoon, and they would meet at the small abandoned cabin in the woods that bordered their farms." 
 
(To be continued) 
 ~Image Source~
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I'm joining Ivy Walker at "Uncharted"
where the cue this week is "craft"
Come and share your story with us!

18 comments:

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    1. I must read Parts 1-3!
      Family history undoubtedly holds surprises for all of us, both good and bad.

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    2. You are right Denise, all of our family trees undoubtedly have a few crooked branches, and those are the most fascinating stories!

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  2. There's nothing like forbidden fruit, is there? Another great installment!

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    1. Yes, we can see where that's heading, can't we? Thanks!

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  3. Now to read one & two! From Crystal over at theqwietmuse.com (for some reason it is only allowing me to post as anonymous)

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    1. Blogger can be so ornery at times! I'm glad you stopped by to check out my story! :-)

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  4. Well you have got me hooked. Can't wait until next week!

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  5. It amaxes me when people can keep the story going week to week! And its good too! I cant wait to see what you do with next weeks cue of sauerkraut! Lol!

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    1. Hey, I could fit it in if I had to! My father was a farm kid of German heritage and they grew up eating sauerkraut. :-)

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  6. "they would meet at the small abandoned cabin in the woods that bordered their farms."
    elegantly visual, the story is engaging, but the imagery doesn't just make it come off the page, it allows the Reader to step into the story.
    very cool

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    1. Thank you so much, Clark! I am trying to put enough in six sentences each week to keep people connected to the storyline. I want this to seem as if I was sharing a story about my family.

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  7. Clark's comment is so right on. I feel so close to the story as you tell the tale. Everyone seems like someone I know, I'm right there in it. Write on, Josie. Sauerkraut, lol.

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    1. I really appreciate your comment, Val! It is a "downhome" story, the kind that come most easily to me, something that might have been passed down in family lore. I feel like I know these people too, I can visualize this taking place at my Grandmother's farm, although the story itself is purely fiction. I could fit sauerkraut in there, it's farm family food where I come from!

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  8. Ohhhh this is sounding so romantic with the courage of young love... even though it will turn sad I'm still completely drawn in!!

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Your comments are always appreciated... they make me smile! :-)