Secrets of the Old Farmhouse - Part I

 
Jill had been in love with her grandparent's farmhouse since the first time she visited them as a little girl, and she could hardly believe that it now belonged to her and Seth; with a little paint and a new roof it was ready for them to move in.
 
Her Uncle Jake has warned them that the old house was drafty in the wintertime, hot and dusty in the summertime, and prone to the electrical problems, creaking floors, and squeaking doors that come with an old house, but he hadn't mentioned anything about the small room off the master bedroom and how you could sometimes feel a cold draft there even in the middle of a hot summer day.
 
The first time Jill noticed it she was in the kitchen cooking and thought she heard a small child crying; knowing she had to be imagining it, she walked through the house until she reached the small room and discovered the window wide open and the air icy cold, but the sound of crying had stopped. It happened at night too, sometimes waking Seth, and even latching the window didn't prevent it from being found open.
 
The puzzle pieces began to take shape when Uncle Jake told them that the room had originally served as a bedroom for the smallest children, with the older ones sleeping upstairs.  Then, as they walked through the family cemetery one afternoon, Jill and Seth discovered the graves of a young woman and a three year old boy that no one in the family had ever talked about. 
 
(To be continued - read more of this story here)
 ~*~*~*~*~*~*~
I'm joining Ivy Walker at "Uncharted"
where the cue this week is "draft"
Come and share your story with us!
 

26 comments:

  1. Really good read, Wendy. I love old houses, drafts and all. We lived in a 100 (or more) year old house when we were building ours many years ago. The woodwork, the hand blown windows were all beautiful features. Your story though, could send a chill or two up my spine. Can't wait to read more.

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    1. Thank you, Val! In writing this story I found myself missing the farmhouse my grandmother and her husband built when they were married, which is now well over 100 years old. It was beautiful, just as you describe. I often think about her now, and wish I could ask so much more about her life there. Those old houses surely do hold some secrets!

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  2. Most old houses could tell such tales. Well done!

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    1. Thank you, Mimi, they surely could. I always think about the lives of the families who lived there when I see an old house. All families have their stories, some known, and some more hidden.

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  3. Whoa whoa whoa, Josie! Damn that gave me chills right up my spine! Last line is perfect. Well done!

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    1. Thank you, Lisa! I'm sure the discovery of those grave markers sent a chill up Jill's spine too! I'm sure she'll be looking for the answers in the weeks ahead. ;-)

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  4. What a great story Josie. I love all the detail you managed to include in six sentences.

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    1. Thank you! It's an intro of sorts, setting up the groundwork for more stories to come I hope.

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  5. Very good, packed with info-you did good!

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    1. Thank you Paul! I can do run-on sentences with the best of them! ;-)

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  6. yeah, amazing setting the stage (not to mention the tone) in six sentences...I'm in! lol

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    1. Thank you, Clark! It is so hard to set up something and initiate a plot in just six sentences. You are very good at it, I'm trying!

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    1. Thank you, Ellen! We'll see what the 6SS prompt is for next week, and if I can add to the story with it!

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  8. Ooh, I love a good ghost story! I recently moved into an old house, built in 1910. It's beautiful, but all the drafts are, as far as we can tell, just old-house drafts. Darn it. ;-)

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    1. You never know, Deborah! Have you checked the attic, all the closets, and the basement? :-)

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  9. Wonderful story ....interesting and leaves one seeking more.

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    1. Thank you, just trying out something for fun here, I do hope to continue this story and perhaps more about the farmhouse!

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  10. Giving yourself a double challenge? I definitely want to hear more!

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    1. Well, it didn't start out that way, but then I realized I couldn't tell the story in my head in just six sentences, so I hope to add more. :-)

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  11. oooohhhhhh, I got a chill from reading this!! I hope Part 1 in the title means we are going to hear more of the story?? :)

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    1. Yes, I think I'm going to run with this for a few Thursdays and see how it goes. :-)

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    1. I hope it turns out to be special, or at least readable! I'm glad you find it intriguing. Old houses have many stories to tell!

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  13. Thankful to be able to read your blogs again. On to part two! ♥

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    1. I'm glad you are stopping by, Pen. I hope you follow the story as it unfolds. It's my first venture into a serial tale.

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Your comments are always appreciated... they make me smile! :-)