Secrets of the Old Farmhouse - Part II

 
 With Uncle Jake being the only other surviving member of Jill's family, she turned to him to solve the mystery of the side-by-side graves in the family cemetery, the larger one which bore the inscription "Catherine 1907-1923", and the smaller one "Joseph 1923-1926." 
 
"My Aunt Catherine was just 15 when she turned up pregnant by a neighbor boy," Uncle Jake explained, "and my grandfather was furious, so he sent her up North to stay with relatives until she had the baby and it could be put up for adoption.  Tragically, she died in childbirth and her body was returned home for burial." 
 
"My grandmother Naomi was so grief-stricken that my grandfather agreed to let her keep Catherine's son," continued Uncle Jake.  "They named him Joseph, and he soon became the light of their eyes; he slept in that small room you asked me about." 
 
Then, when Joseph was three years old, he got terribly sick with pneumonia, and despite the doctor stopping by daily and his grandmother keeping vigil at night, he died in the early Spring and was buried beside his mother.
 
(To be continued) 
 ~*~*~*~*~*~*~

I'm joining Ivy Walker at "Uncharted"
where the cue this week is "light"
Come and share your story with us!

30 comments:

  1. Is this a true story? How tragic!

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    1. No, it's purely fiction, although things like this were sadly common at that point in time. My grandmother used to say "the first baby can come any time, after that they take nine months", which is how they approached marriages of necessity back then.

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  2. Replies
    1. It's fiction, however it's based on a place and experiences I am somewhat familiar with. My grandmother lost a son as an infant, one of five brothers, and her husband also died young due to pneumonia, leaving her to run their farm on her own with the help of her boys.

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  3. I am enjoying the unfolding of this sad and wonderful story.

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    1. Thank you Val, I suspect it will lighten up a bit in the next episode, I needed to lay the groundwork.

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  4. So sad but it happened more often than we know.

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    1. Yes it did, this kind of tragedy was all too common back then.

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  5. Walk through any old cemetery and you will see grave markers that tell just such a tale. So sad...but I enjoy it anyway. Nice take on the cue!

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    1. Thank you, Deborah! You are right, this is not a shocking turn of events for that time.

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  6. Your story has a ring of truth to it, with the cycles of life good and bad, happy and sad.

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    1. I agree, in life joy and sorrow are often intermixed, without sadness we would not know the true value of joy.

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  7. A too common situation in the years before medical science knew better how to care for the mother-to-be.

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    1. That's so true, Mimi, the mortality rate was high for both women during childbirth and or infants and young children who were so susceptible to any diseases that came along.

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  8. Fifth attempt at comments....im going crazy here!!! Its a great story and my previous comments were better than this but im gonna shoot my computer soon.

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    1. Oh, that is so very frustrating when you are trying your best to leave a comment. I commend you for continuing to try, I usually give up. I'm glad you like the story, that's the important part! :-)

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  9. What a poignant tale you are unfolding here. I missed part 1 so I'm on my way back!

    My little story is called The Orchestra

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    1. Thank you for stopping by to check it out, Keith! I'm feeling good about it so far, hope it turns out well.

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  10. What a chilling tale - and there is more??? Is it autobiographical?

    gramswisewords.blogspot.com

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    1. Yes, there is more to this story, stay tuned next week! No, it is purely fiction based on the realities of rural life in that timeframe.

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  11. Although I see that your writing is fiction, there really are so many stories that can be discovered by walking through a cemetery and then searching to learning more about the people. Great story, though sad.

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    1. That is so true, every headstone had a story behind it, a life lived whether short or long. I haven't done too much research of that kind but I know friends who have and it fascinates me. This story will lighten up a little bit next week.

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  12. for all of just being the beginning of the last century (and not, say 1,000 years ago), I always get slightly boggled trying to see the world as it was for people, such a (relatively) short time ago.
    Nice world-building in the arte frugalitatis sense*


    *plus.... plus! italicized latin lol
    enjoying the story.

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    1. My grandmother who lived to be 97 often spoke about how much the world changed during her lifetime. I am beginning to understand that perspective when considering all that has transpired in mine in just sixty years. Sometimes it is truly overwhelming. I look back at the hardships people endured 100 years ago, and I realize how easy we have it and how soft we have become. I'm so glad you are enjoying my story, it's my first venture into a multi-part tale.

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  13. Awww, such a tragic start to the story! Will we get some backstory to Catherine ... and perhaps that neighbour boy? Or how the young grandson' affected their lives? It could go in sooo many directions. :)

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    1. Yes there will be more about Catherine coming soon! :-)

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  14. Replies
    1. Necessary in order for Jill to fully understand what is happening in the old farmhouse! It softens a bit in Part III.

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Your comments are always appreciated... they make me smile! :-)