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Standard Fare

It was Christmas time again, but Michael wasn't feeling very excited.  His mother worked long hours just to feed them and keep the rent paid, and he knew that this Christmas would be the same as all the others, standard fare.  A simple supper of soup and bread, then cocoa and cookies before heading off to bed.  Waking up was sure to be disappointing, just a few gifts wrapped in newspaper underneath their scraggly tree - new socks or mittens, a storybook, and maybe a toy truck or a small stuffed bear.  The other kids in Michael's class would return to school with tales of all the treasures found underneath their Christmas trees.

It wasn't until many years later, as Michael sat near the warmth of the fireplace in his beautiful brick home gazing at the pile of festively wrapped presents underneath the stately Christmas tree, that he looked back on those early memories and realized how much he missed that simplicity.

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I'm linking up with Ivy Walker at "Uncharted" for Six Sentence Stories
The cue this week is "STANDARD"
Come and read what others wrote and share a story of your own!

8 comments:

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    1. Thank You Gail, the older we get the more we realize it really isn't about things at all.

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  2. This makes me smile. At first I thought it was gonna be a huge tear jerker in the other direction ... i remember growing up that way and returning to school to find everyone had a million gifts. We got one and I dont remember feeling deprived but I do recall being embarrassed and never sharing when asked "what did you get for Christmas?" If only we knew then what we know now...

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    1. Papa Bear's childhood was very much like this too, Ivy. Like you, he was happy with whatever gift he received. I've always felt that giving children a mountain of gifts each Christmas and Birthday is a huge mistake, teach them instead to be grateful for each small blessing in their lives. It's not about the gifts, it's about the giving and receiving, and doing both with grace, love and gratitude. I'd like to see folks cut way back on their Christmas spending, take it back to a time when it was far more about faith and family and far less about what to buy.

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  3. The hungry years have their purpose, don't they?

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    1. Indeed they do, Mimi! The both make us grateful for all that we are given in the years after that time, and they also keep us humble and remind us that wealth isn't everything, happiness is a matter of the heart.

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  4. This is very sweet. A little sadly sweet, but still sweet. <3

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    1. Thank You, I think most of us tend to miss the Christmases of our childhood, even if they weren't the best of years.

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Your comments are always appreciated... they make me smile! :-)