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Rushing Waters

~Photo Credit~
Soaking wet and shivering, despite being wrapped in a blanket provided by his rescuers, Zeke could hardly believe his eyes.  He and his friend George has grown up in Independence and had been fishing on the Maquoketa River since they were kids.  But torrential rains had caused the dam to burst that Saturday afternoon in July, sending a torrent of water rushing through the historic river district and destroying every building in it's path.  George and Zeke had been sitting at a table in the brewery located on the second floor of the old mill talking about all the rain when a wall of water came crashing in with tremendous force, sweeping everyone and everything away.  Zeke had managed to fight his way to the surface and grab hold of the top branches of a tree where he was picked up by a rescue helicopter, but George had never been a strong swimmer and was nowhere to be seen.  In a state of near shock, Zeke stood watching the rescue efforts as tears streamed down his face, in an outburst of fury Mother Nature had stolen his friend of  fifty-eight years.

Note: Written in tribute to the lives lost and the lives that have been forever changed by the storms that ravaged our beloved state of Texas and elsewhere across the country this week.  This story is based on a true event that occurred in Iowa in 2010, the photo is of Independence Mill.
 
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I'm linking up with Six Sentence Stories
now at its new home on Ivy Walker's blog "Uncharted"
where the cue this week is "RUSH"
Please come and join us with a six-sentence fiction or non-fiction tale of your own!

22 comments:

  1. Moses. How sad is that, that it's the truth? I've been reading and praying for TX all week. This little story was like a punch in the gut. Life changes way to fast sometimes.

    Thanks again, Josie for letting me host Six Sentence Stories! I am so happy to be doing it!

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    1. The story is fiction, but based on a real event, Ivy. I wanted to give a human face to the disaster, it isn't so much about the flooded streets and buildings, but about the lives that are impacted, and sometimes tragically lost.

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  2. Wow, this is amazing! It is horrible how the weather has been wreaking such havoc.

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    1. It is horrible, places that never experience this kind of disaster are having to cope with this nightmare. It is all so very sad.

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  3. My heart goes out to all who have lost loved ones in the rush of waters this week.

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    1. My heart is with these people too Mimi, one is never prepared for such a sudden and unexpected loss. What a horrible shock it would be to deal with!

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  4. Blimey. That's awful :(

    Well-told...but awful :(

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    1. I agree, Lizzy - almost to awful to contemplate. We want to believe it couldn't happen - but it could, and it does, and it is. :-(

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  5. Oh, damn. :( But, it IS a very nice tribute. . .

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    1. I agree, Feta, it's tragic. I wanted people to get the feel of what it must be like for those who have survived.

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  6. Heartbreaking! And what a picture! Have you escaped flooding youself?

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    1. It sure is, Sarah. To me the photo was more powerful than my words. It's just all wrong for water to be pouring out those windows, and we know that. It makes us shudder. I live in West Texas and we have had an amazing amount of rain, far more than we usually get in an entire year, and more again today, but there are no rivers here to flood, thankfully. The worst of it for us is the temporary inconvenience of flooded intersections in the city... and the foolish ones who try to drive thru them, causing stranded vehicles and people who need rescues.

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  7. Such a very sad story. The power of rushing water and flooding is a natural disaster as opposed to man-made havoc, and so much more difficult to understand and accept the consequences of.

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    1. I agree Val. It would be so hard to come to terms with this kind of loss of friends and family and homes too. Such devastation, and such a tremendous clean-up effort required when it finally subsides. I think it would be very overwhelming. I pray for them.

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  8. The photos (both above and on the news now) are unbelievable, yet I know they are accurate. How sad.

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    1. Indeed Kristi, we want to turn away, we don't want to think about such horror. So quickly lives can change... and be lost. Nature's storms are hard to come to terms with.

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  9. It is unbelievable what's been going on there. How far are you from all of that?

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    1. We are about 350 miles from Austin and close to 600 from Houston, Lisa - Texas is a BIG state! I am thankful we are safe here, but our hearts break for the flooding and loss of life and property that has occurred there.

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  10. Generally we are quite blasé about disasters thinking they won't happen to us. Wherever we are we should always have an escape strategy in mind. The weather makes his own mind on how to behave and ignores us completely.

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    1. That's true Old Egg, we read about tornadoes and earthquakes and floods and think that it happens to other people, but not us. The reality can hit hard. We do need to have a game plan so that we can move quickly to avoid danger.

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  11. Your story is a great reminder of the people affected by natural disasters. There seem to be more and more severe disasters everywhere in the world these days.

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    1. Thank you Romi, that's the what I wanted my story to do. I agree, it seems like every time I read or listen to the news there's bean another natural disaster of huge proportions somewhere. So much pain and suffering that it's hard to comprehend!

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Your comments are always appreciated... they make me smile! :-)