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Sharpen Your Axe

Photo: Once upon a time, a very strong woodcutter asked for a job in a timber merchant and he got it. The pay was really good and so was the work condition. For those reasons, the woodcutter was determined to do his best.

His boss gave him an axe and showed him the area where he supposed to work.

The first day, the woodcutter brought 18 trees.

“Congratulations,” the boss said. “Go on that way!”

Very motivated by the boss words, the woodcutter tried harder the next day, but he could only bring 15 trees. The third day he tried even harder, but he could only bring 10 trees. Day after day he was bringing less and less trees.

“I must be losing my strength”, the woodcutter thought. He went to the boss and apologized, saying that he could not understand what was going on.

“When was the last time you sharpened your axe?” the boss asked.

“Sharpen? I had no time to sharpen my axe. I have been very busy trying to cut trees…”
Reflection:

Our lives are like that. We sometimes get so busy that we don’t take time to sharpen the “axe”. In today’s world, it seems that everyone is busier than ever, but less happy that ever.

Why is that? Could it be that we have forgotten how to stay “sharp”? There’s nothing wrong with activity and hard work. But we should not get so busy that we neglect the truly important things in life, like our personal life, taking time to get close to our Creator, giving more time for our family, taking time to read etc.

We all need time to relax, to think and meditate, to learn and grow. If we don’t take the time to sharpen the “axe”, we will become dull and lose our effectiveness.

I found this story on Facebook today, and felt that it had a message worth repeating...

Once upon a time, a very strong woodcutter asked for a job in a timber merchant and he got it. The pay was really good and so was the work condition. For those reasons, the woodcutter was determined to do his best.

His boss gave him an axe... and showed him the area where he supposed to work.

The first day, the woodcutter brought 18 trees.

“Congratulations,” the boss said. “Go on that way!”

Very motivated by the boss words, the woodcutter tried harder the next day, but he could only bring 15 trees. The third day he tried even harder, but he could only bring 10 trees. Day after day he was bringing less and less trees.

“I must be losing my strength”, the woodcutter thought. He went to the boss and apologized, saying that he could not understand what was going on.

“When was the last time you sharpened your axe?” the boss asked.

“Sharpen? I had no time to sharpen my axe. I have been very busy trying to cut trees…”

Reflection:
Our lives are like that. We sometimes get so busy that we don’t take time to sharpen the “axe”. In today’s world, it seems that everyone is busier than ever, but less happy that ever.

Why is that? Could it be that we have forgotten how to stay “sharp”? There’s nothing wrong with activity and hard work. But we should not get so busy that we neglect the truly important things in life, like our personal life, taking time to get close to our Creator, giving more time for our family, taking time to read etc.

We all need time to relax, to think and meditate, to learn and grow. If we don’t take the time to sharpen the “axe”, we will become dull and lose our effectiveness.

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

16 comments:

  1. I agree wholeheartedly. And I note it doesn't have to take money either. Great post.

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    1. You are right, Annie, there are many ways to relax, recharge your batteries, and enjoy the day without spending money or having access to expensive places.

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  2. so very true. I need to sharpen my axe, in fact!

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    1. I think many of us have lives like that, Lynn, trying to plow ahead with drained batteries and wondering why we come up short. Take time to play... it's healthy! Work to live, not live to work! :-)

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  3. This is a nice story, and a good reminder too. Thank you, Josie, for sharing. I don't have a facebook account, so I guess I wouldn't know this if I haven't read it her, or maybe would read it when it's really old ;o)

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    1. I thought it was a great analogy, Abelle, I'm glad you liked it!

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  4. Very nice post, point well taken, but I must say the woodcutter himself was not very sharp.

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    1. Great point, Joe, I suspect that you are right! :-)

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  5. I completely agree. Thanks for this reminder. ☺

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    1. We tend to see "recharging" as a luxury, Dana, when in reality it is truly a necessity! It's important to be good to ourselves!

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  6. What a wonderful story and lesson.

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    1. A clever way of making the point, isn't it Gail? Some days at the office I find myself needing to remember to stop and breathe, we need to do that on a larger scale when we get home! As it is said, "All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy"... and it makes him die without ever having had any enjoyment in living too!

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  7. It's that need to rest that is one reason Sunday afternoon attendance at Bedside Baptist is mandatory in this house!

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    1. Oooh, I love Sunday afternoon naps, Mimi! It always feels so wonderful to have that one day when the clock doesn't give us our marching orders. I feel asleep in the recliner today for a little while and Tiggy took advantage of a nice warm place to nap... on top of me! :-)

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  8. Replies
    1. Common sense... which is not as common as one might think! :-)

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Your comments are always appreciated... they make me smile! :-)