Pages

Homeward Bound

Joe's ticket was delivered by courier, and he couldn't have been happier.  He'd been hoping and waiting for it the past five years, ever since his Martha died after fifty-one years together.  He had been so lonely without her.  Lately his health had been declining and he missed her loving care; he was more than ready to go.

 Joe spent his last thirty days visiting the places and people that he loved, saying final goodbyes. On the evening of his departure his friends held a big going-away party for him, complete with all his favorite foods.  Each person present spoke about times they'd shared with him through the years.  Their stories were punctuated with laughter and tears, and Joe realized how much he was loved. 

Just before midnight, everyone got into their cars and followed the big limousine taking Joe to the station. He hadn't packed a bag for this trip, he wasn't going to need one. They arrived just as a beautiful train pulled in to the station with "Glory Bound" emblazoned in gold lettering on its side. 

Joe climbed up onto the platform, turned and smiled, and waved one last goodbye.  A shining silver door slid open and he stepped through it, eager with anticipation.  He was going  home, and he knew Martha would be there waiting.

Note: This story is based on my wish that death could be a event to celebrate, not a time of pain, suffering and sadness.  How wonderful it would be if we received a ticket for a train heading from this life to the next one!
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
I'm linking up with Megg at  Sunday Scribblings
where the prompt this week is "ticket".

30 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. I'm adding this to my list of suggestions for the Almighty, Joe, I'm sure my input will be welcomed ;-)

      Delete
  2. This was quite poignant for me as I find it hard to do the same things my wife and I did together such as the theatre, ballet and concerts. You wrote of a interesting way to go as we had only recently traveled on a luxury train trip from South Australia to the Northern Territory in Australia. I must look at the timetables again to see when the Glory Train has seats available!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My heart goes out to you Old Egg, I cannot imagine my life without Papa Bear, it is the sharing part that makes all things fun and good. The Glory Train is one of my favorite fantasies, in fact it might make a good series of short stories about the lives of various individuals who eventually come to ride the train. It is probably good that we aren't able to order tickets, as too often we might be tempted to leave before the play has been played out. Still, there are those who have gone on before that we miss so much... as Joe did, and as I know you do. Papa Bear also has two amazing women that he loved deeply waiting to rejoin him on the other side, and I think of how happy my Dad had to be to be once again united with my Mom. It's a sad but sweet consolation, knowing that we must wait, but it will be worth it.

      Delete
  3. The way in which you die is important and should be valued in a way - as a process to be talked about..reflected upon..made dignified..glory bound..though of course loss is utterly devastating..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I so agree Jae, and I wish no one had to meet with untimely, horrific deaths that happen in so many tragic ways. We need to see death as a natural part of life, not something to fear or avoid... or to rush because we are afraid to live!

      Delete
  4. A glory bound train might help to make it easier. Still never easy for those left behind though.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It would for sure be a nicer way to go Robyn, but certainly the friends and family left behind would still sad, just as Joe was sad without Martha.

      Delete
  5. As I always say, "I want to go to heaven, but not today". Probalbly stole that from someone else. I get sick on trains so maybe a ticket to a rocking chair in the sun...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would be more than happy to depart this life from the comfort of the rocking chair where I sit now, GS, furkid purring on my lap and fingers still warm upon the laptop keys, but finally still at last!

      Delete
  6. Would that there were such a train...

    ReplyDelete
  7. What a wonderful story! I love the idea of a train. ☺

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me too, Dana! I have a long list of creative improvements for life, so I suspect I shall live forever, as God rolls his eyes! :-)

      Delete
  8. I read it wistfully. I don't believe in any hereafter, but this is such wonderfuk imagining!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Granny Smith, we all have our fantasies of how we wish life could be, and when I dream, I dream boldly! :-)

      Delete
  9. That is such a beautiful way to think of it. I remember someone once saying (more eloquently than I can remember), death often happens in just one day, but a person often lives a whole lifetime...remember life! A lovely reminder.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Lulu! I try to focus on the lives of the people I love who have passed on, rather than focusing on the day they died. Good memories are so much nicer than sad ones at the end.

      Delete
  10. But what if you go first?

    Still, it's a beautiful concept, and a lovely story.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If I go first, I hope that Papa Bear's ticket is for the following day, and if he goes first I hope the same for me! I cannot bear to think of life without him!

      Delete
  11. My father told me that he wants a party when he dies, no gloomy funeral. I like the idea of celebrating a life well lived.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I so agree with your father Tara, celebrate the life that was, there will be plenty of time for mourning as the days pass on.

      Delete
  12. Would that that was how it would be. Lovely piece, that. And a really nice idea.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you LceeL! I wish death could really be like this, it wouldn't make the loss any less for those left behind, but it would certainly make the pain easier to bear, and we would all know what to anticipate, so the element of fear would be done away with.

      Delete
  13. Replies
    1. I agree, Keith! It would make for much nicer endings, and better memories for those left behind too!

      Delete
  14. This is beautiful! Celebrating a person's life is so much better than crying bitter tears. We are only traveling from life to life anyway.

    ReplyDelete

Your comments are always appreciated... they make me smile! :-)