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El Santuario


I come here each morning with the others, kneeling in silence to pray for our children, and for their children too.  How clearly I recall the day we brought each of my daughters here to be baptized, and the day of their first communion.  We came together for joyous wedding celebrations; we gathered for the funerals of loved ones and wept. Our children are all gone now, they have moved on to other places and are busy with their own lives.  All that remains is the sound of rosary beads clicking in the shadowy darkness, as this old church and the bodies we once wore crumble together into dust.
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I'm linking up with Lillie McFerrin at Five Sentence Fiction
where the writing prompt this week is "abandoned"

14 comments:

  1. The image at the end of thier bodies decaying and crumbling alongside the old building was a great one - such sad stories this week :-(

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    1. Thank you Sarah. When I saw this old church near Hondo, New Mexico, I could not help but think of the families whose lives had been played out there. It was boarded up and fenced off, yet I so wanted to go inside, I felt strongly that although abandoned, it was not truly vacant.

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  2. Beautifully done and the last line is the perfect icing on the cake! :)

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    1. Thank you Sania! Although it seems a bit sad, I liked the concept of the church and it's former parishioners returning to the earth together.

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  3. A quiet little piece, almost melancholy and your last line in particular is golden.

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    1. Thank you Andy! Yes, as quiet as the spirits slipping in to pray each morning, I'm betting one could hear old kneelers creaking if they listened closely.

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  4. Beautifully written, such is life ;-)

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    1. Thank you Honore! It is indeed the natural order of life, and I'm ok with that.

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  5. How sad. I think of how I'm planning on moving away soon and the fact that my mother isn't taking it well. My thoughts are always that it is a necessity of life to move away for a while, and that I'll never forget or leave or abandoned my mother to a dreary fate. But staying in one place causes the crumbling and that's not what children were meant to do. Sorry to go all thoughtful on your story it just made me think of my own situation. Well done.

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    1. I was reflecting on my own life too, Chantel, both of my parents are now buried in a cemetery distant from where any of their children live. Though we did return when they were still living, I was not able to do so often, having moved the furthest away, and now it will be seldom, if ever, that life finds me there again. The life I knew and the places that were familiar are for the most part gone. I think it is right and natural for children to go off to live their own lives, as long as they stay in touch. I used to love to be a wanderer, now I am quite content to remain at home on my small parcel of land.

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  6. Everything returns to its origins. Everything originates from dust and will ultimately return there one day. An endless cycle which can never stop.

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    1. It is strange that so many people struggle against that concept, Robin, trying to avoid an outcome which is the natural order of all living things. It is not an end, it is simply a transition to another state of being.

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  7. An abandoned building, churches in particular, offer up so many stories. Stories from our own imaginations and from the lives that have inhabited it over many, many years. Always sad to see a ghost of a building, but indeed, the cycle of life is such!

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    1. I agree, Lisa, whenever I see an abandoned house or building the first thing I wonder about is the people that existed within those walls, and the stories that it could tell!

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Your comments are always appreciated... they make me smile! :-)