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Say What?



Given that I am more than a half-century old and somewhat set in my ways, I like to think that I am still able to keep up with current times and adapt to new ways of thinking and doing things.  Each generation of adults has had to learn the language of the young generation coming after them.  Remember when "cool", "groovy" and "far out" were part of our everyday vocabulary?  A new bit of youth-speak has developed in recent years that annoys my husband and me to no end...  when you say "thank you" to almost anyone under the age of thirty the common response now is not "you're welcome" as were taught is appropriate, but rather "no problem". 

What?? I didn't really anticipate that it would be a problem for you to assist me in whatever way, since most likely you are in a job or situation where being of service is part of what you are paid for. Sometimes I want to blurt out "Well that's certainly a relief!"  Yet I know that my oh-so-clever response would only be met with a blank stare or a look of pity.  Where the hell did "no problem" come from? Who woke up one day and decided that was the better response to "thank you", and how many young lemmings followed blindly along?

I really don't think I am a fuddy-duddy, at least not yet, but I would so love to hear our young people return to a time of better manners all the way around, and saying "you're welcome" would be a great start.  On the rare occasions that it does happen, I am pleasantly surprised and think to myself that some actual parenting must have taken place at this person's home.  Am I just behind the times? Do you think "no problem" is the standard of the future?  Or do we just have a group of young people who are so self-focused that they feel the need to let you know that at this particular moment we have not placed an unnecessary burden on their lives by requiring of them a bit of assistance or service.  Ok, ok, I'll end this little rant now and focus on bigger issues, no problem! :-)

Note: This post is being shared at Sunday Scribblings where today's writing prompt is "modern".

25 comments:

  1. Ah, an area of disagreement.

    I was brought up on "you're welcome." And I've never quite understood what it meant. You're welcome to what? Whatever service I provided? A bit too subservient for my tastes.

    Ya know what...this is gonna be a blog post so I'm gonna go write it.

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  2. Ok, Ranting Monkey, I have to agree that "you're welcome" may be a bit hard to translate, it's just the more comfortable familiar. I'm curious to read what you propose as an alternative.

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  3. Tsk..how true..I have to say you're very lucky to get a 'no problem' in the UK..a grunt and a sigh is more commonplace..I have always found customer service in the US far superior..have a nice day! Jae

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  4. THanks for dropping by Jae! Courteous customer service has to be taught and reinforced by managers. A job is more than earning a paycheck, a smile and a bit of good manners go a long way!

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  5. I must say I use "no problem" a lot and to be honest it's I use "your welcome" like the word "love" I only say it when I mean it. I only say Your welcome to people who actually meant their Thank you and it was not a automated response beat into them. Even at work my response to Thank you is "It's what I get payed to do thanks for keeping me employed".

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  6. May be the older generation, like us and young people today are two separate species....or maybe it's just evolution.. I do know what you mean, though! :)
    xx

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  7. Loved your allusion to lemmings when referring to those alien creatures below us. You shouldn't complain "no problem" won't stay long but be replaced by something infinitely worse or as Jae says a grunt at best!

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  8. Hey Krazed Rabbit, glad to see you stopping by to comment, sorry I had my settings wrong. I like the idea of saying thank you, you're welcome, and using the word love when you really mean it. Maybe we just don't mean it often enough? I agree totally with "it's what we are paid to do", but if you do it with heart or at least a reasonable amount of effort and good itent, I am happy to thank you for trying... especially when it comes to service people!

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  9. I'm sure every older person feels out of sync with the next generation Gwen, and in another ten years that will be the commonly accepted response. I will adapt, we know what happened to the dinosaurs when they didn't or couldn't!! :-)

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  10. Oh I do so hope you are wrong, Old Egg, but I fear you are right, we seem to be headed in that much too blunt, no politeness at all direction. FUnny though, a smile can make all the difference in interactions with strangers!

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  11. You're welcome is how I was raised, but as mentioned above, it doesn't make a lot of sense and I can't stand a response of no problem. It sounds so flippant. Chick-fil-A has trained their employees to respond, "my pleasure." I like that.

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  12. I think flippant is a good word to describe how "no problem" goes over with me too, Tee. I love "my pleasure". Think I'll remember that and use it more often. And maybe at times when it really hasn't been it will give the other person pause to ponder if I'm being serious or sarcastic?! :-)

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  13. It isn't just generations. Regional influences matter, also. In the South children are taught to always use "yes, sir...no, sir." I hate it and it seems rude and subservient to me. I am also past half a century.

    Gloria

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  14. I agree, I am also over the fifty mark by a few years and I can not stand the response "No problem" or worse " Not a problem". It sounds like your interaction with them was indeed a problem.

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  15. You're right Gloria, where I grew up, Yes Sir and Yes Ma'am were heard only rarely, though year ago children were taught that way. I see it more as addressing one with respect, as long as it's sincere. I can see how some might feel it seems subservient though, unless you believe as I do that we are all servants of each other and our Creator, and that humility is a virtue.

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  16. I'm with you pugsx4, I have a real problem with "no problem". To me that doesn't translate that I am happy to be of service but rather that it wasn't too terribly inconveniencing. It probably isn't meant that way, it just comes off that way. I guess I'm becoming a grouchy old granny that doesn't much care for youth-speak. I remember my Dad grumbling about such things in his later years!:-)

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  17. Since Bing is a high school teacher, we know all the lingo. The only one that really, really pisses me off is when someone says something is "gay."

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  18. That one really bothers me too Maria, for all the obvious reasons. Anything that promotes intolerance, no matter how subtle, is not cool, it's wrong.

    Another expression that is weird to me is that good things are "sick". Being sick wasn't cool or groovy when I was that age. It isn't much fun at this age either! :-)

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  19. Great subject for discussion. When a cashier gives you your change back and you say thank you and they say...nothing. I think they should be thanking you for shopping there. My clients thank me when I finish their hair. I always thank them back!

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  20. This is great! It's funny how we carry on and alter language. Maybe it is freeing in some way, but certainly(already mentioned above) some are missed opportunities, only changed to be ridiculously strange. I am in my early thirties and of a slightly different generation, but I fully understand. Why make it complicated and offensive??

    I am more than happy when one of my little ones greets me with a "Well, thank you, Mama." when I do something as simple as serve lunch.

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  21. I agree Cheryl, thank you can never be said too often. Everyone likes to feel appreciated. I thank our clients for calling in to provide information updates or check on their cases. It lets them know it's ok to call, after all - they are our business!

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  22. Welcome to my blog, Archna! I agree, nothing warms the heart like hearing thank you from someone you love... no response necessary! :-)

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  23. my son says "sure" instead of "yes please" and that irks me

    senryu of lost soldiers

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  24. I'm with you zongrik, manners are form of being polite, please and thank you are so much nicer to hear!

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  25. Oh Dear! I say that. But it isn't anything new for here. Maybe it came from Australia along some strange grapevine. I never thought of it like that before.I either say, 'no problem' or smile and say 'no worries'.

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Your comments are always appreciated... they make me smile! :-)